Knee Jerk Vol & the Fed

 

The Fed is now shrinking its balance sheet; they are no longer buying new securities as they mature. Below is a bit of analysis on if the Fed’s recent activities in shrinking its balance sheet is the cause of the recent rise in volatility.

Quick note: Data is at a weekly tenor, from Jan. 8, 2014 to April 4, 2018.

vixtreasurysspApr6.JPG

The thinner vertical line denotes when the Fed began to shrink their balance sheet last October; the thicker vertical line denotes when we had that massive vol spike in February of this year.

On the surface, the Fed’s action doesn’t appear to be the cause of all the hullabaloo, i.e. the shift from risky assets to safer assets.

If we turn to bonds, we see the following.

vixtreasurys10yrApr6.JPG

Rates on 10-Year Treasurys have moved higher since the Fed began shrinking it’s holdings of US Treasurys. Recall, bond prices fall as rates rise. Less buyers = lower prices = higher rates.

It appears these movements aren’t directly related to the recent rise in volatility.

However, there appears to be an inverse relationship between bond rates and the VIX Index.

A simple linear regression would see if the markets follow each other and if there was any preditcability between the markets. The equation is as follows:

eqnvixbondsApr6.JPG

Regression Summary:

reg summary apr6.JPG

We see a significant coefficient, with a value of -8.545, and an insignificant alpha. Therefore your new equations is:

eqnvixbondsnewApr6

If you predict a 25 bps rise in bond rates, we would expect to see a 2.3136% fall in the VIX Index, with 95% confidence:

eqnvixbondsnew2Apr6.JPG

The VIX is crazy volitile and the regression has a small R squared, so take the results with a grain of salt.

 

Thanks for reading,

/tommander-in-chief

Sauces:

  1. http://www.statisticshowto.com/probability-and-statistics/f-statistic-value-test/
  2. https://www.cnbc.com/2015/09/25/what-happened-during-the-aug-24-flash-crash.html
  3. https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/TREAST
  4. Yahoo Finance
  5. Bloomberg

 

Note: The VIX and the 10-Yr are already percentages, so they’re calculated in absolute terms.

Delta VIX = VIX Value Today – VIX Value Yesterday

Delta 10-Yr = 10-Yr Today – 10-Yr Yesterday

Advertisements

Bogus Tweet Risk

 

Most financial media is focused on “tweet risk” or “trade wars”. To me, these seem like water under the bridge. It’s in China’s interest politically to retaliate to trade sanctions, but not in their interest to crash US markets. They hold a massive amount of US Treasurys, if they stop buying US bonds, rates will shoot through the roof and China loses. The following analysis attempts to succinctly summize the economic situation.

Tempered Expectations of Future Growth

We’ve crossed the 50 bps level in the 2 to 10 year US Treasury Spread, signaling lower expecations of future growth prospects, strengthening the late stage economic growth narrative.

2to10_apr3.JPG

 

US Dollar Slides

DXY_10YR_Apr3.JPG

The DXY Index represents the US Dollar vs a basket of major currencies. Yields in the above chart are represented by the Generic 10-Year US Treasury yield. Higher yields depreciate a currency, as stated by Interest Rate Parity.

A weaker dollar allows foreign investors more buying power in US markets.

Resilience of US Goverment Capital Markets

The 10-Year Treasury rate now sits at around 2.75% following last week’s sale of a LOT of Treasurys. The market is handling this flood of supply well (nearly $300bil last week), as bonds have rallied in the face of rising interest rates. The US Treasury Department will auction off $48bil of 3-month T-bills and $42bil of 6-month T-bills this week.

Rates on the short end are slightly higher following a Fed funds rate hike in March, but longer term yields have fallen since last month signaling strong demand for US debt.

YC_Apr3.JPG

Higher Volatility but Lower Tail Risk

We’ve seen elevated levels of stock market volatility since the beginning of the year. However, since last month we’ve seen less tail risk, i.e. a flatter Volatility Skew.

  1. Elevated levels of Volatility overall
  2. Lower levels of Vol Skew

skew1mAgo_3mTenor.JPG

Tail Risk is the risk of a Black Swan event. This is measured by the relative demand of out of the money calls and puts. As the volatility smile flattens, the market is pricing in less tail risk, albeit at an elevated level of overall volatility.

Higher vol means more trading, which is good for financial services, as are higher rates. A trade war will be bad for industrials. I’ll be watching financials (XLF), and industrials (XLI).

Thanks for reading,

/tommander-in-chief

What I’m Reading: Lords of Finance: Bankers Who Broke the World

 

Sauce:

  1. https://www.wsj.com/articles/treasury-to-sell-90-billion-in-debt-1522342484
  2. https://www.wsj.com/articles/foreign-investors-are-bulking-up-on-u-s-treasury-bonds-once-again-1522693557

Disclaimer: The opinions above are my own and are for information purposes only.  This post is not intended to be investment advice.  Seek a duly licensed professional for investment advice.

 

Trouble in Yellen-Land

Bond markets and the Fed aren’t making sense.

The Fed (“Yellen”) rose the Federal Funds Rate (FFR) last Wednesday, June 12th to a range of 1.00% to 1.25%.

The Fed has two mandates: (1) to keep prices stable (i.e. keep inflation around 2%) and (2) to minimize unemployment. In other words, stabilize the economy by cooling it off when growth gets too fast and heating the economy up when growth slows.

The mechanisms to do this are two fold. The Fed can raise the “Federal Funds Rate” (FFR), making short term credit less available. The FFR is the lowest rate at which a financial institution can borrow. If you raise the lowest rate available in US markets, everything else should follow. Right?

Wrong. The FFR is a very short term instrument. Changes in the FFR only change short term interest rates. (See: Term Structure of Interest Rates). This brings us to our second weapon in the Fed’s arsenal: the Balance Sheet. The Fed can buy and sell securitized mortgages and government debt. They can hold assets on their balance sheet to synthetically alter the supply of debt at longer tenors.

Quantitative Easing (QE) by the Fed flooded markets with cash by purchasing bonds in the open market in order to promote lending (i.e. liquidity). The Fed’s balance sheet exploded… I mean EXPLODED. Check this post for relativity. In the most recent Fed statement, the Committee agreed it would soon be time to bring the balance sheet back to “normal”. This means they will no longer buy new treasuries or redeem matured securities.

Once balance sheet normalization begins, there will be less demand for Treasuries and yields should rise, ceteris paribus. Right?

However, longer term treasury yields have fallen while short term rates rose. This results in a flatter yield curve. Growth in the US and the world remains tepid; and inflation in the US remains under the 2% target rate, but the Fed sees fit to continue tightening monetary policy.

So what gives Janet? 

This morning, Lisa Shalett, Head of Wealth Management Investment Resources at Morgan Stanley, wrote: “… we believe the Fed has embraced a new narrative that extends beyond its mandate of full employment and 2% target inflation.”

The Fed isn’t raising rates because our economy is heating up; they’re trying to combat the next recession proactively. They’re ‘normalizing’ the FFR and the balance sheet back to levels where they can reasonably combat the next recession.

OK, but why the flatter yield curve?

A colleague of mine introduced the idea of relative interest rates as an additive theory. The risk/reward profile of US debt is one of the best in the world. For example, the 10-year government debt yield in Singapore is comparable to the same rate in the US. Would you rather have Singaporean dollars or US dollars given current market conditions? That being said, we have seen a sell off in the US dollar since the beginning of the year. Take a look at what has happened to the US dollar since President Trump took office:

USDsinceTRUMP

The dollar has rallied and subsequently sold off since the election. In my colleague’s argument, the dollar should rise. If there is a high demand for Treasury bonds, we will see a rise in demand for dollars. You can’t buy US government debt with foreign currency; you have to convert it to US dollars first. More buying of USD pushes up the price.

The recent bond market rally on the long end of the yield curve has pushed rates lower. This could be from more demand as per my colleague’s point; or the bond market is calling bullsh*t on the Fed’s optimistic outlook for the economy because a movement from stocks into bonds signifies a move to safety. When the 10- to 2-year spread tightens, it signifies lower growth expectations in the future.

tenminustwosinceTRUMP

When Trump was elected, stock markets rallied. The so called “reflation trade” became all the buzz and a “risk-on” mentality became popular. Check out the pop in the 10 to 2 on November 8-10th. This was a spark of optimism that the US economy might see some fiscal stimulus. Since, the bond market has postulated that the current administration might not be able to meet goals in respect to healthcare and infrastructure stimulus, thus spreads have narrowed and expectations tempered.

To review:

The Fed says we’re growing at a healthy clip, with inflation rising. Their reflation narrative is weak, and the bond market isn’t buying it.The Fed is trying to stockpile ammo before the next recession.

What I’m watching:

An inverted (i.e. negative) 10- to 2-year spread has preceded EVERY recession in recent history. Check it out:

10two

Keep an eye on the 10 to 2.

What I’m Reading:

Thanks for reading,

– Tommander-in-Chief

 

Disclaimer: there are SO MANY moving parts in finance. It’s impossible to point to any one factor because it’s always a combination of several or many factors that affects markets.